New York Employees Can Take Paid Leave to Receive COVID-19 Vaccine

On Friday, March 12, 2021, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law a bill (S.2588A/A.3354B) that allows public and private New York employees to take paid time off to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Employees are permitted take up to four hours of leave per injection, meaning an employee who receives a vaccine that requires two doses…

OSHA Releases New COVID-19 Workplace Safety Guidance

On January 29, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released new guidance on best practices to mitigate and prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace. This guidance follows President Biden’s January 21, 2021 Executive Order calling for OSHA to issue new COVID-19-related workplace safety guidance. Looking ahead, the EO also called for…

NYC Expands Protections of Fair Chance Act for Employees and Applicants With Criminal Records

In January 2021, amendments strengthening the NYC Fair Chance Act became law and will take effect on July 29, 2021.  These amendments extend protections to employment applicants with pending criminal accusations and arrests, and convictions arising during employment. Employers may not inquire or act adversely against an applicant or employee with a non-pending arrest, adjournment…

COVID-19 New York Update: NY Department of Labor Issues New Guidance on Use of COVID-19 Sick Leave

In March 2020, New York State passed emergency legislation in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that requires employers to provide job-protected COVID-19 sick leave to employees subject to an order of quarantine or isolation. See LR’s prior What You Need to Know Now updates on the legislation here and here. On January 20, 2021, the…

Congress Passes Second Stimulus – What it Means for Worker Protections and Unemployment Assistance

On December 21, 2020, Congress passed a $900 billion stimulus package. If signed into law, the second stimulus bill would extend some of the federal protections specifically created during the pandemic for workers and those who have lost their jobs due to COVID-19, while reducing some of the earlier protections. The Families First Coronavirus Response…

Department of Labor Regulations Expand Paid Leave for Certain Healthcare Workers

On September 11, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (DOL) announced changes to its rules concerning the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), the law that provides paid sick leave and expands family and medical leave for individuals impacted by COVID-19. The DOL changes came in response to a decision of…

Working from Home? DOL Guidance Requires Both Employers and Employees to Ensure Hours Worked Get Reported

As the necessity for teleworking continues due to COVID-19, employers and employees are still grappling with the changes brought about by a significant increase in teleworking. The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division recently published guidance regarding timekeeping while teleworking.  While acknowledging employers’ legal obligations for recordkeeping and reporting, the DOL also places…

Supreme Court Denies Review of Salary History Defense in Pay Inequity Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court recently declined to consider a case that would have addressed the validity of a common defense used by employers to justify pay discrepancies between male and female employees in the same job. In Yovino v. Rizo, a math consultant sued her employer under the Equal Pay Act  (“EPA”) after she learned…

Employees Who are DACA Recipients Get Temporary Reprieve as Supreme Court Halts the Trump Administration’s Push to End DACA

The Supreme Court blocked the Trump administration’s attempt to dismantle the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, giving DACA participants some reprieve from the threat of deportation. The DACA program, first implemented by the Obama administration in 2012, granted renewable permits to study and remain in the United States for some undocumented immigrants who…